THE HALLOWEEN FACE IN THE BATHROOM

Carved pumpkin

Pumpkin carving, a Halloween tradition.

When my kids were at home it was their job to carve the scary faces on the pumpkins.  I also had them scoop out the “flesh” of fall’s bright orange squash so I could make pumpkin pies.

Now I cheat.  A couple of ceramic pumpkins already wearing carved faces and placed on a plate with a candle inside does the trick.  What’s more they look every bit as Halloweenish as did the real thing.  Well, maybe not quite so much.  As my in-house experts advanced in years their talents increased exceedingly.    Using the most humble of kitchen knives and scoops with utmost proficiency the more ghostly the carved pumpkins became as the artists scraped out more and more of the pumpkin flesh making the shell creepily translucent.  While I do miss the activity and the main fresh ingredient for pies I get along very nicely using the old standard:  Libby’s pumpkin in a can.

Meanwhile, I find I enjoy this holiday more now than when the house was filled with our children.  There was always so much hubbub in getting costumes ready – not only for the big night – but for school and other celebrations:  costumes on – costumes off, this party that party, costumes on – costumes off.  Then it seemed, in the past, that day-light-savings time never cooperated, switching back to standard time the week before Halloween making it really dark at dinnertime (even when eating was bumped up to 5:00 p.m.).  Chaos reigned trying to feed kids a bit of real food before they hit the neighborhood for candy while we ran back and forth answering the constant demand of the bell as early trick and treaters opened their pillow cases for the required ransom.

Kristina, the granddaughter who lives with us, loves Halloween.  At 22 her sites are no longer on dressing up for treats.  It’s been fun for me watching her get ready for this bedecked and bejeweled holiday.  She found a saloon girl dress at a vintage shop in Santa Curz and spent the last few weeks acquiring the accessories to make her costume complete.  Her young man, also Chris, found chaps transforming him into the needed cowboy to escort his “Lady in red” to various parties.  A really fun holiday and I didn’t have to do anything but watch, although I did help her with a minor alteration.  And I am totally prepared with a cauldron full of candy for the night visitors.

Living with Alzheimer’s I am determined that life will be as normal as possible, so I continue our celebration of All Saints Eve.  Decorating is simple, but effective.  I like the orange candy lights which I scatter over one specific juniper bush.  Towering above, is a ghost made from two sheets ruffled over a couple of pieces of wood stuck behind the lights in the same bush, and for the head a very large,  round light globe salvaged when an outdoor fixture was replaced.  Easy up, easy down.

For a few years, even with his disease, Ken helped, but often took down the decorations each morning not remembering the holiday was yet to come, so together we would put everything back in its place. This year there isn’t much notice from my husband.  It’s almost as if he looks, but doesn’t see.  A tall ghost surrounded with small orange lights means nothing to him as he gazes out of the front window, but I continue with tradition not only for me but for our numerous great grandchildren and Jessica, our youngest granddaughter who is 11 and blends right in with her cousins of another generation.

This morning as Ben and I were getting Ken ready for the day he looked at me with disdain as I held his restrained hands while Ben did the cleaning.  “You don’t know anything,” he growled giving me a “duh” expression.  His contorted face made me laugh out loud.  Ben looked over and laughed as well.  Ken continued making faces finally sticking out his tongue like a naughty five-year-old boy.  “Why are you making those funny and scary faces?” I asked, still laughing.  Ben looked again and said, “Faces he probably made as a young boy.”  Stopping my giggles I asked my husband, “Are you getting ready for Halloween?”

On Halloween night, later in the evening, Jess will pay us a visit with her mom and dad.  She will be wearing a surprise costume which her mother made especially for her.  Perhaps Ken will show her his little-boy faces even sticking out his tongue, and then add a few scary ones – or not.  More than likely he will be unresponsive.  However, in a pretend perfect world he would be just Grandpa looking at her with love in his eyes – remembering who she is, who she was and anticipating, with all of us, who she will become – saying something like, “You are a beautiful fairy princess, Jess (or an awesome Darth Vader — whatever the costume) and  I love you.”

So this Halloween when unseen visitors from the past make their presence known, when witches fly through the air on  broomsticks, or  ghosts and goblins dash about the streets disappearing over the hills and unexplained apparitions appear from no where, perhaps the real Ken will be allowed to sneak away from the prison of Alzheimer’s and be just plain Grandpa – for a time.  Stranger things have happened.

We can only wish.   Maybe someday we can catch that very first magical evening star to wish upon.  If it’s the right one, wishes are  supposed to come true.

Originally posted 2010-10-30 21:44:16.

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