medications

THE BEST THING

It was Saturday night and I had hoped to have Ken settled in so I could go to bed early.  I felt unusually tired and he had been beastly all day: very agitated, very angry, very arrogant and argumentative.  He is on medication to cut down on the agitation and it usually works, but not that night.  Suggested dosage is one half pill in the morning and another toward evening.    Nothing seemed to make him happy or subdued, so instead of waiting until evening I gave him the other half in the late afternoon and another half pill (with the doctor’s permission) around 8:00 p.m.  Instead of him becoming calm he became more hyper and more angry.  Even the Tylenol PM at 10:00 o’clock was ineffective as he wandered from room to room ranting and raving and ordering me to leave.

Exasperated beyond description I went into the office and opened the computer thinking I would work for an hour or so.  When he becomes very unreasonable it’s easier to just lock myself in and him out.   I pay no attention to his demands to open the door and eventually he settles down in front of the TV.  Usually, he will sit for a while, get drowsy and I can talk him into getting ready for bed.

After an hour I peeked around the corner and found him ransacking the refrigerator.  “What are you doing?”  I asked.  “I’m hungry,” he replied.   “But we had dinner,” I insisted.  “Maybe you had dinner,” he growled, “but I didn’t.  I’m hungry.”  Perhaps some food would subdue him, I thought, so I made him a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.  He ate half and told me that’s all he wanted.  He went back to sitting in front of the TV.  It was midnight.  “Please go to bed,” I begged.  “No,” he answered.  “I’m going to watch TV all night.” 

Exhausted and sleep deprived I went back into the office.  I couldn’t believe how wired he was — and why?  I returned to the computer.  The letters I typed danced up and down on the monitor and when I tried to proofread I fell asleep at every other line.  How I ached to go to bed and the more sleep deprived I became the more my anger grew.  I raged into the night, cursing that I had ever met him — that we had married — and in my frustration I imagined a simple, uncomplicated life without this deranged man — any man.  Why hadn’t I remained single, opting for a career in New York instead of marriage.  At that moment I saw myself sleeping in the bedroom of a lovely apartment  high above the city.  The room was silent and I was alone — how glorious — then my reverie vanished.  I crossed my arms on the desktop, dropped my head and cried.

It isn’t as though I can’t leave him alone.  At times I do, but only for a while and usually he is sleeping or happily occupied reading junk mail when I run to the bank or do other small errands.  I would be fearful to fall asleep with him in his present frenzied condition.  Even if I pulled the 220 fuse controlling the stove, I would not feel comfortable.   In addition to ransacking the pantry and the refrigerator, he leaves water running and lights on everywhere; and he could hurt himself.   On one of his stubborn nights I found him in the living room on the floor.   Apparently he had fallen getting out of a low chair.   Had I been asleep he would have been there all night. 

Finally, the house seemed quiet as I ventured out to see what he was doing.   Still watching TV, he appeared to be more relaxed.   Softly I asked, “Let’s go to bed.”  He said, “Okay.”  It was 3:00 a.m.

I slept fitfully and awoke at 10:00, staggered into the kitchen/family room and switched on the television.  Through my burning eyes the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco appeared on the screen.   I first thought it to be a travelogue, but the scene changed showing two men in a row-boat: one young and the other older.  The younger man spoke briefly; something about not being sure of marriage.  I decided it must be an old movie.  Still recovering from the previous night, I plopped myself  into a chair.  If I watched I didn’t have to do anything else — at least not for a while.  The camera focused to the older man — a Catholic priest — who answered the younger man’s question with reference to marriage, “It’s the best thing I ever did.”  Continuing, he explained that he had been married to a wonderful woman for 26 years.  When she died he entered the priesthood.

I watched this rather silly movie to its end where thousands of young women scurried to the church in response to an ad for marriage to this very wealthy, but reluctant swain.   Following a series of wild chases up and down the hills of San Francisco, he eagerly married his true love with all of the would-be brides as witnesses.   The movie will be easily forgotten, but I’ll remember the most thought-provoking line the writer wrote:  “It’s the best thing I ever did.” 

I remembered the night before; my anger and cursing my own marriage of more than a half century.  It has been a good marriage — not a perfect marriage  — not a perfect man or a perfect woman.  I don’t believe there is that kind of perfection, at least not in this world.   However, I will give my marriage a good solid B — better than average.  Looking back on our youthful beginning I wonder if I thought of “in sickness and in health” as meaning anything more than a cold or the flu.  How naive that would have been, but more likely I don’t believe either of us thought about illness.  After all, isn’t youth invincible?   Healthy young people on the brink of a new life don’t look very far down the road.   And if they did glimpse the ending would it alter their decision to go forward? 

Our life together has brought us our share of adversity and has now thrust upon us this illness of unmeasurable grief and sorrow, but it has also showered us with years of happiness, joy and the blessings of an ever-expanding family.  Our five remarkable children, now showing signs of greying hair and middle-age spread, have bestowed upon us grandchildren and they in turn have given us great-grandchildren, and our posterity will go forth.  Thinking of my imagined single life I had to ask “me” if that’s what I really would have wanted.  Had I chosen not to marry what would that other life be like for me today?  Even without looking down the untaken road I would have to conclude that life without my family, without Ken, would be unbearably lonely and colorless. 

In the bright, warm light of Sunday morning I believe I received something to ponder; perhaps even a Heavenly message through a silly old movie and from an actor portraying a Catholic priest reminding me that, indeed, marriage is the best thing I ever did.

Originally posted 2009-05-15 06:56:12.

DO MEDICATIONS START OVER 50 OR IS IT 70?

prescription medications

It’s important to take precautionary steps when using medications with ALzheimer’s patients. photo courtesy CC

I often think medications for most people are just something that occurs when people get older. I’m not sure of the beginning date. Thinking back I do recall how surprised I was to hear my doctor tell me that my blood pressure was a little on the high side and that I would have to start taking some medications for it. At the time somewhere past 60, I believed it was something that a few pills would correct, then I could relax until I really needed medications for one thing or another. The good doctor informed me otherwise. With hypertension the patient really needed to take his/her medicine possibly for the rest of one’s life.

I’m not sure whether Ken being a runner, managing his health by eating right and keeping in shape, but his blood pressure was never an issue. But then his illness was Alzheimer’s not hypertension.

Continue reading

Originally posted 2016-07-22 22:35:16.

NIGHTMARES

“Help, help!  It’s the wolf.”  It was the middle of the night and I leaped from my bed and ran into the bedroom of our little girls.  Snapping on the light to let Debbie, our six-year-old, know that I was there to chase away the fear and to hold her close so she would understand that everything was all right. Patting her small back as she clung to me I couldn’t help but smile a guilty smile at my unwise decision to read “Little Red Riding Hood” as a bedtime story.  It was one of her favorites as was “The Three Little Pigs” who also had issues with a big bad wolf.  “Please, please,” she had coaxed handing me the tattered little book, “please read ‘Little Red Riding Hood.'”  So I relented and read the scary story before turning off the lights.

Harmless fairy tales when the sun shines, but the wolf proved a bit more menacing in the darkness of her room.   A hug and a few kisses and reassurance that it was just a bad dream; that the story was only a fairy tale and there was no wolf in her room soothed my frightened little girl.  Finally, comforted and content she snuggled down in her bed and went back to sleep.  The worrisome wolf with the big teeth “the better to eat you with,” was gone.  Such is the stuff of which bad dreams are made when you are six.

For me, the villain of my first remembered childhood nightmare has vanished, but not the terror I recall as I struggled to free myself from the grip of that frightening dream.  My older sisters had been telling ghost stories to one another and I listened wide-eyed and trembling as an eight-year-old, not wanting to hear what they were saying, yet glued to the edge of the bed as they expanded the gory details of their tale, no doubt giggling inside at their gullible little sister.

Finally awakening from the horror, the real world didn’t feel any better than the nightmare.   Wide awake I was somewhat relieved, but in the blackness of my room, the misty experience lingered, and behind every shadow I imagined some lurking “thing” which could leap out and harm me — or worse.   I buried my head under the covers and closed my eyes ever so tightly, wanting to call out to my mother, but too frightened to make even a sound.  Somehow I must have fallen asleep because the next thing I remembered the room was filled with sunlight washing away shadows and hidden ghosts — and the best part  — I was still alive.  Such is the stuff of which bad dreams are made when you are eight.

Everyone has bad dreams and nightmares for any number of reasons.  My last run of recalled mid-night unpleasantness came about because of a new prescription for high blood pressure.  They were, once again, nightmares with me as the intended victim of any number of horrible characters cloaked in black capes and hoods, demons and even an assassin where I ran and ran and ran with “it” or him close behind wielding a dagger to do the dastardly deed.  The attempt to escape from those dreams was nearly more difficult than escaping from my imagined tormentors.  The dreams finally stopped when the doctor changed the medication.   Such is the stuff of which bad dreams are made when you are a grown up.

But suppose there was a nightmare from which the victim could not awaken?   As Alzheimer’s continues to claim the mind of my husband, I often see him frightened and agitated, and I believe it’s partly fear which, at times, makes him disagreeable, uncooperative, angry, combative and downright mean.  When I see him drop into his agitated mood my heart sinks.  This particular mood, which seems a “must” occurs at least once a day, usually taking place anytime from late afternoon throughout the entire evening, and well into the night and even the wee small hours of the morning, or it can last a comparatively short period.

Introducing that mood, he seems to “mark time” barely lifting one foot then the other from the floor — kind of like a little boy who has to go to the bathroom.   This mood — this personality — this action —  this — whatever it is I dread the most.  Communication with him is at his choice, shutting me out and any of my efforts to reach him.  If he does speak to me his words are insulating or degrading.  Somewhere inside his body there appears to be a mountain of pent-up energy which requires disbursement.  At times he can be subdued with the aid of a tranquilizer* and two or three Tylenol PM tablets* in the evening.  Other times he overrides the medication and cannot be subdued.  I confine his agitation activity to the living/dining room, the hall, bathroom and our bedroom.  Every other room is off-limits to him:  locked.  I lock them not to be mean, but to keep some kind of order in the house and to make life a little easier for me.  He doesn’t need to ransack everything in every room.  During part of these moods he becomes obsessive-compulsive and spends that time rearranging whatever he touches with ritualistic exactness.   It does no good to correct him, to suggest anything to him, or to make an effort to redirect his interest elsewhere.  For most of this time he remains alone  in his nightmare world obsessing and searching endlessly for his elusive home.

I imagine him like a robot where the control panel is out of commission allowing any of the robot’s still-functioning electronics to misfire sending nothing but broken signals of confusion (much like Ken’s diseased brain).  With Ken, the misfiring sparks a jumble of emotions: love, hate, abandonment, suspicion, loss and fear, and it seems as if fear and loss are paramount.  It’s no wonder he’s frightened as he looks around in his own home where we have lived together for more than a half century and recognizes nothing.  And me?  Surrounded by confusion, he sees me as an enemy and is, understandably, even more fearful and defensive.  I am a stranger in his midst and although I am a woman — his wife — he is still afraid of me.  By watching him, I can tell when he feels threatened and as his anger peaks toward rage I know he can become combative.  Until he is able to calm himself I often walk away, locking our bedroom door, which leaves him totally alone until the agitation subsides and the anger dissolves.   It’s during these wild episodes when I think of him as experiencing the most terrible of bad dreams:  ones where no mother can give him comfort, no sun-drenched room chases away the ghosts, and no doctor can write a new prescription.  Ken’s life is held captive in a terrifying dream-like world with no way to escape and no way to wake up from this awful torment.  Such is the stuff of which nightmares are made when you are a victim of Alzheimer’s disease.

*See Blog titled “This’ll either cure ya, or kill ya, or….

Originally posted 2010-02-07 09:41:39.

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